01 marzo 2016

The Fifth Wave: Movie vs Book

Sorry for not having the entry ready for this Monday! I was editing one of Kass's books and took more tha expected. *cries*
¡Perdón por no tener la entrada lista para este lunes! Estaba editando uno de los libros de Kass y tomó más tiempo del esperado. *llora*

¡Clic aquí para leer en español!

Several days ago I was talking about The Fifth Wave, but the film (only in Spanish). For me it was such an interesting and original story I decided to also read the first book in the trilogy. Beforehand I say it was better than I expected, and as always, the original printed version exceeds the celluloid adaptation.
The plot in general is very accurate, now I know both versions, but as I said, I prefer the novel. Yancey makes the reader feels in the story with incredible ease. It seems that at times reality will fade and an improved film take possession of your senses while you're reading.
The Casey's character's much more human here than on the big screen, reveals her weaknesses more clearly, her strength is less present for much of the book, but when it makes an appearance, it does so explosively that counteracts its absence very much.
The loneliness that this girl lives for so many days in a row is almost palpable, you feel it squeezes your heart and quickens when hers does, both minds are synchronized so that you begin to think like her for longer than would be considered healthy; who writes this did and thought of ways to defend himself and survive in a similar situation.
Zombie's also a much more credible and more responsive better profiling character. The tortured boy makes to form a very strong knot in your throat while discovering his past, his mistakes and decisions that torture him, and the conflict that breaks out inside as he discover the truth behind the invasion as well.
The way his mindset changes, his character, his decision making, his entire inner world is mutating after being recruited for war against invasion, but shows a credible rapid growth forced a hasty and early maturity. It touches you to see that the child and the adult fight each other, but also creates the necessary voltage at the indicated times the fact that brain and heart fail to agree.
I have also have to make noted that the nonsense in the film, scenes I really saw meaningless in the book are entirely sensible. The changes seen weren't actually well made, and I don't understand really why to do them when in the book they're quite credible.
As an example, without speaking of the novel, the "Bear Scene" with Sam and Casey on buses is hole-like, it doesn't seem logical in adaptation, but reading I find something else and more realistic, more dramatic, more touchingly and more truely. It seems they ruined that scene n purpose; as the saying goes, every head is different.
On the other hand, some parts of the book itself are more polished on the big screen, like the discussion between Zombie and Vosch or the one between Casey and Evan following the gun's discovering by our main girl; They are somewhat lower quality crude moments in the book and leave a light bad taste in the mouth to read.
Leaving the protagonists, the next character that surprised me was Evan. In the film looks like a drug addict during... 90% of the time, I'd say. In the original version is more human, more natural. I could believe his gestures, his words, but that one incarnated in the skin of Alex Roe seemed a compulsive hallucinogens smoker. It's not bad as it seems, I must say, but if you compare both sides, I'll stick with the original.
One thing that struck me was seeing a male Reznik. I'd seen a very motherly woman at first, hard and regal, but with a visible heart; however when reading, Rick Yancey presents a heartless man, someone in which apply all the insults and derogatory adjectives of this world and the next. Again, I stay with the original; painful to see that change in a character with so much potential when making the film, but not everything's perfect in life.
Not to make this longer, and summarize in a few lines, I think almost the same as Zombie's squad, all alike, although I must say that while reading the book in English I got a bit lost during military scenes and the first mission these childen had to face. If this language's not your mother tongue, better read in Spanish or see the movie first to better understand these parts, although some Reznik scene that doesn't appear in the film is quite understandable; other pain to see the differences.
What can I say I already haven't? It was expected the book to be bigger than the adaptation, couldn't expect less, and yet I enjied both of them. It is a lightweight, fast, simple and very human reading above all. I lost track of time while turning the pages, and I'd lie if I say I won't read it's sequel or wait forward to the second film, but by the lack of profits and the avalanche of negative reviews I've seen, I doubt this comes to pass.
We need to wait, and yet we still have the second book, The Infinite Sea, and a third that's coming out this year, May 26, The Last Star. As I said, we have to wait.
Remember to read this week's new chapter in Wattpad! Amelia's life gets kinda VERY complicated. Click here to read!
¡Recuerden leer el capítulo de esta semana en Wattpad! La vida de Amelia se pone un poco MUY complicada. ¡Clic aquí para leer!
Greetings and hugs!
¡Un saludo y un abrazo!

No hay comentarios.:

Publicar un comentario

Thanks for coming to Tinta Nocturna!
Hugs from here to whereever you may be ^^

***

¡Gracias por pasarte por Tinta Nocturna!
Un abrazo de aquí hasta donde estés ^^

Nocturnos.